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Automated Anniversary Clock Identification System


Devised and produced using information from Anniversary Clock Identification by Mervyn Passmore, with the permission of the author.
Copyright Mervyn Passmore, 2009.

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If you
  • Wish to identify the maker of an Anniversary Clock
  • Would like to discover the model of the 400 Day clock you own
  • Want to find out the correct size and thickness of the replacement suspension wire for a torsion clock
  • Need to know which winding key fits which movement
  • Want a jig to assemble the unit
  • Would like to buy a book on identification or setting up of 8 day, 30 day, 400 day or 1,000 day anniversary clocks
  • Or simply want to know a bit more about Anniversary Clock Makers and models

Then you have come to the right place!

The first step is to look at the back-plate of your clock, and try to identify the factory that made it. Names and logos on the face might be useful if they match one of the names in the list below, but often they are names of retail jewellers, importers etc. If you can find a logo on the back plate that appears in this list, just select that name by ckecking the button next to it and go to the bottom of the page. If you cannot find your logo or name in the list, or if it has none, use one of the top two options in the list. This may help you find the manufacturer.



Manufacturer Recognition tips Typical logos
NO MAKERS NAME
Some movements have no text at all. Others may have Made in Germany, Germany, etc. or just a serial number. 
There is a name, but NOT IN THIS LIST Many factories stamped the importers' names on their movements. Some importers purchased from more than one factory. 
Badische UhrenfabrikEither marked with the logos shown, or unmarked. Most models have lantern (wire) pinions instead of the more common solid steel pinions. Badische Uhrenfabrik bought most of their movements from Andreas Huber and branded them Badische.   The Badische logo of the letter B in a crescent moon  
Franz HermleExpect to find the distinctive FHS (Franz Hermle & Sohne) logo.   The FHS logo of Franz Hermle  
Gebruder JunghansThe majority of movements have round unmarked plates.    
Gustav BeckerThe majority of movements have the logos shown, plus a serial number.   The distinctive Gustav Becker logo  
Henn    
Jahresuhrenfabrik A. Schatz (SCHATZ)The majority of early movements have no name or logo (except perhaps the two elephants), but later examples are normally clearly marked with the name and the model number.   The  Schatz 49 logo The Jahresuhrenfabric Elephants logo The Jahresuhrenfabrik Schatz 49 logo  
KaiserThese clocks are famous for their globe pendulums. They also sold conventional 400 Day clocks, but bought the movements from Petersen.    
KernKern movements almost always have a version of the KS logo, unless marked with K.u.S followed by the movement reference.   One of the Kern logos  
Kieninger & Obergfell (KUNDO)The early KO logo of the two letters in script can be hard to decipher when first seen. Later movements bear the full name and/or the Kundo logo   The rather confusing KO logof Kieninger and Obergfell The Kundo logo of Kieninger and Obergfell  
KienzleA Kienzle clock is more likely to have a movement made by Andreas Huber than by Kienzle. Badische Uhrenfabrik also bought from Andreas Huber    
Konrad Mauch (KOMA)The majority of movements have the logo shown. Most have a very distinctive cut-out at the top. The factory discovered that the mainsprings in the miniature and midget models were under-powered, so you will need to measure the barrel width to identify exactly which one you have.    
Nisshin Clock Co (MASTER)This Japanese factory made several models, but not of the German quality.    
P. HauckUnmarked movements, except for a serial number, normally close to a vertical ratchet wheel cut from solid brass.    
PetersenPetersen movements are normally marked W. Petersen, but they were also bought by Kaiser who stamped their own name on them.    
Shmid-SchlenkerW. A. Shmid-Schlenker made small antique reproductions, many with musical boxes beneath.    
Siegfried HallerEarly examples were seldom marked but later models normally bear the Haller name. Midget and Miniature models have the same sized plates, and there are two versions of each, making identification more difficult. A midget can be distinguished from a miniature by the shape of the pendulum locking bracket. This is the bracket that the pendulum is pushed up against when the locking lever is engaged. A Miniature clock has a bracket screwed to the backplate. On the Midget, the bracket is an extension of the platform on which the movent sits. You may need to refer to Anniversary Clock Identification by Mervyn Passmore to make an accurate identification.    
Uhrenfabrik HerrUhrenfabrik Herr & Reiner appear to have worked so closely together that their listing have been combined. These can often be found marked with the name of an importer or with no name, but seldom with Uhrenfabrik Reiner or Herr. Identification of specific models is very hard without a copy of Anniversary Clock Identification.    
Uhrenfabrik ReinerUhrenfabrik Herr & Reiner appear to have worked so closely together that their listing have been combined. These can often be found marked with the name of an importer or with no name, but seldom with Uhrenfabrik Reiner or Herr. Identification of specific models is very hard without a copy of Anniversary Clock Identification.    
VosselerThe majority of movements have round plates.    
WurthnerMarked Georg Wurthner or Wurthner Western.    

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Extracts from the 350 page Anniversary Clock Identification by Mervyn Passmore. Copyright by Mervyn Passmore 2009. All rights reserved. No part of the content of these online pages or the book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of the author.